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Chlamydia and Gonorrhea, Screening, 2014

* Indicates an old grade definition


Recommendations: Screening for Chlamydia and Gonorrhea

  • Chlamydia: Screening -- Sexually Active Women
    Grade: B
    Specific Recommendations:

    The USPSTF recommends screening for chlamydia in sexually active women age 24 years and younger and in older women who are at increased risk for infection.

    Frequency of Service:

    In the absence of studies on screening intervals, a reasonable approach would be to screen patients whose sexual history reveals new or persistent risk factors since the last negative test result.

    Risk Factor Information:

    Age is a strong predictor of risk for chlamydial and gonococcal infections, with the highest infection rates occurring in women aged 20 to 24 years, followed by females aged 15 to 19 years. Chlamydial infections are 10 times more prevalent than gonococcal infections in young adult women. Among men, infection rates are highest in those aged 20 to 24 years.

    Other risk factors for infection include having a new sex partner, more than 1 sex partner, a sex partner with concurrent partners, or a sex partner who has an STI; inconsistent condom use among persons who are not in mutually monogamous relationships; previous or coexisting STI; and exchanging sex for money or drugs. Prevalence is also higher among incarcerated populations, military recruits, and patients receiving care at public STI clinics. There are also racial and ethnic differences in STI prevalence. In 2012, black and Hispanic persons had higher rates of infection than white persons. Clinicians should consider the communities they serve and may want to consult local public health authorities for guidance on identifying groups that are at increased risk.

  • Gonorrhea: Screening -- Sexually Active Women
    Grade: B
    Specific Recommendations:

    The USPSTF recommends screening for gonorrhea in sexually active women age 24 years and younger and in older women who are at increased risk for infection.

    Frequency of Service:

    In the absence of studies on screening intervals, a reasonable approach would be to screen patients whose sexual history reveals new or persistent risk factors since the last negative test result.

    Risk Factor Information:

    Age is a strong predictor of risk for chlamydial and gonococcal infections, with the highest infection rates occurring in women aged 20 to 24 years, followed by females aged 15 to 19 years. Chlamydial infections are 10 times more prevalent than gonococcal infections in young adult women. Among men, infection rates are highest in those aged 20 to 24 years.

    Other risk factors for infection include having a new sex partner, more than 1 sex partner, a sex partner with concurrent partners, or a sex partner who has an STI; inconsistent condom use among persons who are not in mutually monogamous relationships; previous or coexisting STI; and exchanging sex for money or drugs. Prevalence is also higher among incarcerated populations, military recruits, and patients receiving care at public STI clinics. There are also racial and ethnic differences in STI prevalence. In 2012, black and Hispanic persons had higher rates of infection than white persons. Clinicians should consider the communities they serve and may want to consult local public health authorities for guidance on identifying groups that are at increased risk.

  • Chlamydia and Gonorrhea: Screening -- Sexually Active Men
    Grade: I
    Specific Recommendations:

    The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of screening for chlamydia and gonorrhea in men.

    Frequency of Service:

    No Frequency of Service information currently available.

    Risk Factor Information:

    No Risk Factor Information currently available.

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