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Cervical Cancer, Screening, 2012

* Indicates a new grade definition


Recommendations: Cervical Cancer

  • Cervical Cancer: Screening -- Women 21 to 65 (Pap Smear) or 30-65 (in combo with HPV testing)
    Grade: A*
    Specific Recommendations:
      This recommendation statement applies to women who have a cervix, regardless of sexual history. This recommendation statement does not apply to women who have received a diagnosis of a high-grade precancerous cervical lesion or cervical cancer, women with in utero exposure to diethylstilbestrol, or women who are immunocompromised (such as those who are HIV positive).The USPSTF recommends screening for cervical cancer in women age 21 to 65 years with cytology (Pap smear) every 3 years or, for women age 30 to 65 years who want to lengthen the screening interval, screening with a combination of cytology and human papillomavirus (HPV) testing every 5 years.    
    Frequency of Service:
      Screening women age 21 to 65 years every 3 years with cytology provides a reasonable balance between benefits and harms. Among women age 30 to 65 years, HPV testing combined with cytology (co-testing) every 5 years offers a comparable balance of benefits and harms and is therefore a reasonable alternative for women in this age group who would prefer to extend the screening interval.Screening with cytology more often than every 3 years confers little additional benefit, with large increases in harms, including additional procedures and assessment and treatment of transient lesions.
    Risk Factor Information:
      No Risk Factor Information currently available.
  • Cervical Cancer: Screening -- Women Younger than 21
    Grade: D*
    Specific Recommendations:
      The USPSTF recommends against screening for cervical cancer in women younger than age 21 years.
    Frequency of Service:
      No Frequency of Service information currently available.
    Risk Factor Information:
      There is adequate evidence that screening women younger than age 21 years (regardless of sexual history) does not reduce cervical cancer incidence and mortality compared with beginning screening at age 21 years.
  • Cervical Cancer: Screening -- Women older than age 65 and who have had adequate prior screening
    Grade: D*
    Specific Recommendations:
      The USPSTF recommends against screening focervical cancer in women older than age 65 years who have had adequate prior screening and are not otherwise at high risk for cervical cancer.
    Frequency of Service:
      No Frequency of Service information currently available.
    Risk Factor Information:
      There is adequate evidence that screening women older than age 65 years who have had adequate prior screening and are not otherwise at high risk provides little to no benefits.
  • Cervical Cancer: Screening --Women who have had a hysterectomy
    Grade: D*
    Specific Recommendations:
      The USPSTF recommends against screening for cervical cancer in women who have had a hysterectomy with removal of the cervix and who do not have a history of a high-grade precancerous lesion (cervical intraepithelial neoplasia [CIN] grade 2 or 3) or cervical cancer. 
    Frequency of Service:
      No Frequency of Service information currently available.
    Risk Factor Information:
      There is convincing evidence that continued screening after hysterectomy with removal of the cervix for indications other than a high-grade precancerous lesion or cervical cancer provides no benefits.
  • Cervical Cancer: Screening -- HPV testing in women younger than age 30 years
    Grade: D*
    Specific Recommendations:
      The USPSTF recommends against screening for cervical cancer with HPV testing, alone or in combination with cytology, in women younger than age 30 years.
    Frequency of Service:
      No Frequency of Service information currently available.
    Risk Factor Information:
      No Risk Factor Information currently available.
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