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Chlamydial Infection, Screening, 2007

* Indicates a new grade definition


Recommendations: Chlamydia

  • Chlamydia: Screening -- Women Ages 24 and Younger OR Women Ages 25 and Older at Increased Risk
    Grade: A
    Specific Recommendations:

      The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends screening for chlamydial infection for all sexually active non-pregnant young women aged 24 and younger and for older non-pregnant women who are at increased risk.

      Note: The USPSTF has updated their grade language and recommendation statement format. The new grade language and an explanation of the new format is available at: How to Read the New Recommendation Statement: Methods Update

    Frequency of Service:
      No Frequency of Service information currently available.
    Risk Factor Information:
      All sexually active women 24 years of age or younger, including adolescents, are at increased risk for chlamydial infection. In addition to sexual activity and age, other risk factors for chlamydial infection include a history of chlamydial or other sexually transmitted infection, new or multiple sexual partners, inconsistent condom use, and exchanging sex for money or drugs. Risk factors for pregnant women are the same as for nonpregnant women.

      Prevalence of chlamydial infection varies widely among patient populations. African-American and Hispanic women have a higher prevalence of infection than the general population in many communities and settings. Among men and women, increased prevalence rates are also found in incarcerated populations, military recruits, and patients at public sexually transmitted infection clinics.
  • Chlamydia: Screening -- Pregnant Women Ages 24 and Younger OR Pregnant Women Ages 25 and Older at Increased Risk
    Grade: B
    Specific Recommendations:
      The USPSTF recommends screening for chlamydial infection for all pregnant women aged 24 and younger and for older pregnant women who are at increased risk.

      Note: The USPSTF has updated their grade language and recommendation statement format. The new grade language and an explanation of the new format is available at: How to Read the New Recommendation Statement: Methods Update

    Frequency of Service:
      No Frequency of Service information currently available.
    Risk Factor Information:
      All sexually active women 24 years of age or younger, including adolescents, are at increased risk for chlamydial infection. In addition to sexual activity and age, other risk factors for chlamydial infection include a history of chlamydial or other sexually transmitted infection, new or multiple sexual partners, inconsistent condom use, and exchanging sex for money or drugs. Risk factors for pregnant women are the same as for nonpregnant women.

      Prevalence of chlamydial infection varies widely among patient populations. African-American and Hispanic women have a higher prevalence of infection than the general population in many communities and settings. Among men and women, increased prevalence rates are also found in incarcerated populations, military recruits, and patients at public sexually transmitted infection clinics.
  • Chlamydia: Screening -- Women Ages 25 and Older, Not at Increased Risk
    Grade: C
    Specific Recommendations:

      The USPSTF recommends against routinely providing screening for chlamydial infection for women aged 25 and older, whether or not they are pregnant, if they are not at increased risk.

      Note: The USPSTF has updated their grade language and recommendation statement format. The new grade language and an explanation of the new format is available at: How to Read the New Recommendation Statement: Methods Update

    Frequency of Service:
      No Frequency of Service information currently available.
    Risk Factor Information:
      All sexually active women 24 years of age or younger, including adolescents, are at increased risk for chlamydial infection. In addition to sexual activity and age, other risk factors for chlamydial infection include a history of chlamydial or other sexually transmitted infection, new or multiple sexual partners, inconsistent condom use, and exchanging sex for money or drugs. Risk factors for pregnant women are the same as for nonpregnant women.

      Prevalence of chlamydial infection varies widely among patient populations. African-American and Hispanic women have a higher prevalence of infection than the general population in many communities and settings. Among men and women, increased prevalence rates are also found in incarcerated populations, military recruits, and patients at public sexually transmitted infection clinics.
  • Chlamydia: Screening -- Men
    Grade: I
    Specific Recommendations:

      The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of screening for chlamydial infection for men.

      Note: The USPSTF has updated their grade language and recommendation statement format. The new grade language and an explanation of the new format is available at: How to Read the New Recommendation Statement: Methods Update

    Frequency of Service:
      No Frequency of Service information currently available.
    Risk Factor Information:
      All sexually active women 24 years of age or younger, including adolescents, are at increased risk for chlamydial infection. In addition to sexual activity and age, other risk factors for chlamydial infection include a history of chlamydial or other sexually transmitted infection, new or multiple sexual partners, inconsistent condom use, and exchanging sex for money or drugs. Risk factors for pregnant women are the same as for nonpregnant women.

      Prevalence of chlamydial infection varies widely among patient populations. African-American and Hispanic women have a higher prevalence of infection than the general population in many communities and settings. Among men and women, increased prevalence rates are also found in incarcerated populations, military recruits, and patients at public sexually transmitted infection clinics.
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